What were the consequences of the Indian Removal Act quizlet?

What were the consequences of the Indian Removal Act quizlet?

What were the consequences of the Indian Removal Act? This force the Cherokees to go on a long hard journey from their homeland to Indian territory one fourths of their population died and this was known as the trail of tears. Not all of the Cherokees moved west.

Why did Congress pass the Indian Removal Act of 1830 Check all that apply?

The Indian Removal Act was a federal law that President Andrew Jackson promoted. Congress passed the law in 1830. Because Congress wanted to make more land in the Southeast available to white settlers, the law required Native Americans living east of the Mississippi River to move west of it.

Why is the Indian Removal Act bad?

What was the main purpose of the Indian Removal Act of 1830?

What was the effect of the Indian Removal Act of 1830?

What were the arguments in support of Indian Removal?

They felt that building factories, expanding farming, and constructing new roads and railroads would be a better use of the land. These people also believed that the white ways of living were superior to the Native American ways of living. Other people felt it was wrong to remove the Native Americans.

How long did the Indian Removal Act last?

Milestones: 1830–1860.

Why was the Indian Removal Act bad?

Jackson warned the tribes that if they failed to move, they would lose their independence and fall under state laws. Jackson backed an Indian removal bill in Congress. Members of Congress like Davy Crockett argued that Jackson violated the Constitution by refusing to enforce treaties that guaranteed Indian land rights.

Did Daniel Webster support the Indian Removal Act?

Daniel Webster, Henry Clay, and David Crockett, among many other legislators, also opposed it. Senators and Congressmen on both sides of the issue introduced many memorials from their constituents supporting or opposing the bill.

Which of the following was an outcome of the Indian Removal Act?

Introduction. The Indian Removal Act was signed into law by President Andrew Jackson on May 28, 1830, authorizing the president to grant lands west of the Mississippi in exchange for Indian lands within existing state borders. A few tribes went peacefully, but many resisted the relocation policy.

Who opposed the Indian Removal Act of 1830?

Davy Crockett

Why did the American government want to remove American Indians?

Since Indian tribes living there appeared to be the main obstacle to westward expansion, white settlers petitioned the federal government to remove them. Under this kind of pressure, Native American tribes—specifically the Creek, Cherokee, Chickasaw, and Choctaw—realized that they could not defeat the Americans in war.

What were some effects of the Indian Removal Act?

Explanation: The Indian Removal Act of 1830 was signed into effect by President Jackson, which allowed Native Americans to settle in land within state borders in exchange for unsettled land west of the Mississippi. Many Native American tribes reacted peacefully, but many reacted violently.

Did Thomas Jefferson support the Indian Removal Act?

Jefferson never removed any Native Americans. However, in private letters he did suggest various ideas for removing tribes from enclaves in the East to their own new lands in lands west of the Mississippi. Indian Removal was passed by Congress in 1831, long after he died.

What was the purpose of the Indian Removal Act of 1830?

To achieve his purpose, Jackson encouraged Congress to adopt the Removal Act of 1830. The Act established a process whereby the President could grant land west of the Mississippi River to Indian tribes that agreed to give up their homelands.

Who benefited most from the Indian Removal Act?

Most white Americans supported the Removal Act, especially southerners who were eager to expand southward. Expansion south would be good for the country and the future of the country’s economy with the later introduction of cotton production in the south.

Who caused the Indian Removal Act?

However, more immediate reasons did cause Congress to pass the Indian Removal Act of 1830 during Jackson’s presidency. The factors contributing to the fate of the Cherokees were the discovery of gold on Cherokee land, the issue of states’ rights, and the emergence of scientific racism.

What Native American group were affected by the Indian Removal Act?

The Indian Nations themselves were force to move and ended up in Oklahoma. The five major tribes affected were the Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Creek, and Seminole.

What were the consequences of the Indian Removal Act of 1830?

Intrusions of land-hungry settlers, treaties with the U.S., and the Indian Removal Act (1830) resulted in the forced removal and migration of many eastern Indian nations to lands west of the Mississippi.

What tribe fought the Indian Removal Act?

Andrew Jackson and the Indian Removal Act. The great Cherokee Nation that had fought the young Andrew Jackson back in 1788 now faced an even more powerful and determined man who was intent on taking their land.